German verb

     

       
   

Infinitiv : Infinitive

Infinitive - an indefinite form, like in English: to do., i.e.: to write=schreibEN, to walk=laufEN, to go=gehEN,...

Imperativ : Imperative Form

Imperative form, that is used to give orders or request., i.e.: Go! Take! Give me! ...
   wir
( )


   du
( )


-    Sie
( - )


   ihr
( )

Vergangenheitsform : Past Indefinite

Same as Past Indefinite (Simple Past) and Past Continuous in English.
ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Präsens Indikativ : Present Indefinite

Same as Present Indefinite (Simple Present) and Present Continuous in English.
ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Futur I : Future Indefinite

The same as Future Continuous and Future Indefinite (Simple Future) in English.
ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Plusquamperfekt : Past Perfect

The same as Past Perfect in English.
ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Perfekt : Present Perfect

Present Perfect. The same is Present Perfect in English, but it is also more often used, where English speakers would use Past Indefinite (Simple Past), apart from the verbs sein and haben.
ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Futur II : Future Perfect

This is used in the same way as in English.
ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Konjunktiv II (Konditional) : Subjunctive II (two)

The General Subjunctive Mood is used to describe or express doubts, unrealistic condition (that could have happened but it had not.). It is also used to describe condition that might have happened but it is not clear if it did happen. These sentences are also used to express wishes or desires, like: I would do it.
These sentences are also often used to express requests, the same way as English speakers would use structures like: would like to.
As a rule of thumb, you use these sentences, where in English you would you the conditional sentences with the help of would. In German, however, you can use either würden=would, or the subjunctive form of the verb itself without würden, like: Ich hätte gerne das Radio.=Ich würde gern ein Radio haben.=I would like to have a radio.
For more on this, read the article, Dartmouth: der Konjunktiv II.

Konjunktiv II Futur I (Präsens Konditional) : Present Subjunctive II

ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Konjunktiv II Futur II (Perfekt Konditional) : Perfect Subjunctive II

ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Konjunktiv II : Subjunctive II

Konjunktiv II Präteritum : Present Subjunctive II

ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Konjunktiv II Plusquamperfekt : Past Subjunctive II

ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Konjunktiv I : Special Subjunctive

The Special Subjunctive Mood is mainly used for expressing the indirect speech, like: She said, she would do it.
It is also used in recipes and manual to express instructions, like: One should put three spoons of sugar.
The major difference between English and German here is that in English one part of the sentence is dependent upon the other, but in German both parts are independent of each other.
In English, if the first part is in the past, than to express future in the second part, you have to use would, like: I knew, you would come.. But in German, in the second part, you can use any tense, no matter which tense you use in the first part, and therefore in German you can, literary, say: I knew, you will come.=Ich wuste, du werdest kommen.

Konjunktiv I Präsens : Present Special Subjunctive

ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Konjunktiv I Perfekt : Past & Perfect Special Subjunctive

ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Konjunktiv I Futur I : Future Special Subjunctive

ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie

Konjunktiv I Futur II : Future Perfect Special Subjunctive

ich

wir

du

Sie


ihr

er,sie,es

sie


Passiv : Passive Voice

Passive Voice (Passive Mood) is used in a very similar way as in English, and it is constructed mainly with the help of the verb werden + Perfect, but with some verbs you can use werden as well as the verb sein instead of werden.






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